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USS ATLANTIS CVX-4575

The Atlantis CVX-4575 by Colourbrand
Atlantis is a design i started long ago first time i designed her win Star Trek III: The Search for Spock came out
now im working on updating her design an make a technical manual an few short story's with right writers for it
an new designers willing to work with me shes my enterprise i have story in works in my head for her just need to get it out there any one wanting or inspired by her note me or im me will do art trades for Atlantis work an designs
U.S.S. Atlantis CVX-4575 REFIT by bagera3005






History becomes Legend
Legend becomes Myth




STATISTICS
Class & type: Atlantis class
Production Base: Key West
Length: 1222m
Width: 640m
Height: 312m
Mass: 22,000,000 tons (operational)
Decks: 45
Range: Unlimited distance
Complement:
Total : 2450
Officers : 150
Crew : 900
Passengers : 400 (Standard
star wing: 400

Quantum jump drive Propulsion System
Drive Type : Q.S.I.D .X100 Core
Number : 1
Main Reactor : FRAM-2000
Quantum jump :
experimental drive system developed for the
Impulse System
Drive Type : Ark 245 hyper Impulse
Number : 4
Secondary Reactor: FRIF-1200
jump capable : range RED LINE IS 600 light years


ARMAMENT
Phaser, Type X1
Number : 11 banks
Range : 400,000 km
Arcs : main hall module dorsal array (P/S)
main hall module vetral array (P/S)
main hall aft (P/S)
secondary hulls vental array
secondary hulls aft dorsal array (P/S)
secondary hulls aft ventral array (P/S)
Torpedo lunchers
Quantum Flux Torpedo Mk III MK XXI Seeking/Direct
Number : 8 tubes
Range : Quantum 8,900,100 km, Photon 8,000,000
Arcs : 6 forward, 4 aftDefenses
Ablative Armor Type Xi
Ablative Armor Type Xi
Multi Layered Shielding System

Defenses
Ablative Armor Type Xi
Ablative Armor Type Xi
Multi Layered Shielding System
Deflector shields
Shield beam advaced shild arayPrimary Shield Systems: FSS XXV Multiphasic/Regenerative Forcefield and Deflector Control System
Secondary Shield Systems: FSS-4 Primary Forcefield and Deflector Control System
Stealth Systems: RS-455 stealth systom
Structural Integrity Field Systems:
Primary Structural Integrity Field Systems: Class 8 Structural Integrity Field Generators
Secondary Structural Integrity Field Systems: Class 8 Structural Integrity Field Generators
Tractor Beam Systems:
Primary Tractor Beam Systems: Class Delta 10 Tractor Beam Emitter System
Secondary Tractor Beam Systems: Class Beta 10 Tractor Beam Emitter System

CRITICAL MASS CANNONS
Number : 6 ARCS
Range : 900.000
Arcs : 6 forward, 6 aft
Point Defense Lasers, type I
Number : 40 (6 turrets of 3 lasers each)
Range : 200000 km
Arcs : main hall turrets (p/s)
: main hall ventral turrets (p/s)
: secondary hulls lower turrets (p/s)
: secondary hulls lower turrets (p/s)

OTHER SYSTEMS
Transporters
Standard, 6-person : 6
Emergency, 16-person: 6
Cargo : 8

Shuttle an Fighter bays
Shuttle Bays : 2
Embarked Craft (Standard, specific ships may vary)
Shuttlepod : 20
Personnel Shuttle, Small: 30
Personnel Shuttle, Large: 10
Shuttle, Q-Warp : 12
Cargo Shuttle : 10
Runabout : 8
Landing Crft (Marine) : 12

Fighter bays 6
250 2 XF -400 Talon superiority Star fighter
80 XF-310 F alcon light fighter
100 XF-105 Eagle
100 XF-500 Warewolf heavy attack fighter
12 heavy drop ships
20 light drop ships
4 Cyclone class
Pylons on the lower and main hall Pylons
MACHA BAY
20 AVS 100
10 AST 200
15 AST-RX -M1
40 AST XR-8S
10 REX X-0 11









JUMP DRIVES

Atlantis jump drive is a part of her warp systems an works with it making Atlantis range longer then most ship with only warp systems on bored

Physics
The FTL Drive uses a dimensional transport effect. The ships instantaneously teleport from one point in space to another. helium 10 On human ships, the FTL Drives are powered by refined hydrogen an . When a ship jumps, it distorts the space around it and can damage other vessels that are too close.
Navigation is very complex when using the FTLs. Speed, trajectory and jump duration must be carefully calculated before a successful jump can be made.

Making a jump without these calculations, can take the ship into dangerous locations such as asteroid belts, singularities, or a planet's atmosphere
Atlantis class have a jump limit known as the "Red Line." Any ship making a jump across this line risks unknown navigational hazards and possibly running off course due to compound errors in the calculations

Atlantis class RED LINE IS 600 light years

QUANTUM WARP DRIVE

Is a variant of quantum slipstream drive but much safer. It is a hybrid Atlantis lunched she had standard warp drive the
lost worlds fleet showed Atlantis crew a new drive idea and it was upgraded to a quantum Warp drive All it is quantum
stabilizer which adds to the slip stream drive and now modified. It has a quantum exhilarated making the drive 3 time's
more reliable then slip stream drive or any Transwarp system It also has been now to have higher warp speeds so she
can hold a speed
Of (9.995) for extended periods
And Quantum speeds for high speed get always or just to get to hot spots
Of battles it also helps power C.M.C and shields

SPEED CHART AGIST WARP SPEED

QUANTUM VELOCITY apparent Velocity 0.9c Approximate Warp speed
-- ------------------- ---------------------
A 8 1.7 1.090
B 7 6.1 1.569
C 6 21.4 2.394
D 9 85.0 3.572
E 10 262.6 7.673
F 20 919.1 9.715
G 30 3217.0 9.976
H 40 9.990i 39407.8
J 50 137927.4 9.9999

Quantum warp has no warp one you accelerate from to the warp the ship
Was originally on.


CRITICAL MASS CANNONS

C.M.C
Is a weapon that fires a round of depleted uranium 235 to the speed of?Light C+ causing a fusion reaction in the uranium pack. A punch round is charged then fired out of a modified field coil. To sling the shell out of the barrel to C+ and then is adjusted to target by a magnetic ball shield, but will not stop C.M.C stiletto it will go through shields and throw all most any Mattel expedite for a Romulus Mattel use for their warp core until now systems can not be put on smaller ships, they take up two decks and are power hungry.
24% mass shot rapid fire low power damaging round
50% mass half mass shot grazing damage on outer hauling star ships but vessel impacted is crippled or destroyed.
75 % mass is a large load and can go straight throw a Borg cube
100% mass will destroy a 95 percent of a Borg cube the Atlantis has to fire all c.m.c to do fall power shot it
most power is use to fire 100% power

Shell Types
Stiletto c-1
Haller c-2
Tri cobalt round c-3
Quantum round c-4
Shaker round c-5
Dart round c-6
Knights shot c-7
Archer tracking round c-9
Grape shot ball barring or C-10
Heavy barrel cd-1

Torpedo launches

Torpedoes will obtain a high sublight speed when launched from a stationary launch platform. They are still effective against close-in threat vessels. The fact that a class 8 probe was supposedly launched by a starbase at warp speeds in "The Emissary" might be inconsistent with the statement that photon torpedoes can't reach warp speed if launched from a stationary or a sublight platform.
Torpedo tube
A torpedo tube was a compact area of a starship where torpedoes are stored immediately prior to launch. It was a part of the torpedo launcher. Tubes could be controlled from the bridge or from the torpedo bay. (ENT: "Silent Enemy")
Typically, the torpedo tube was only slightly larger than the torpedo itself. It lay between the torpedo bay and the torpedo tube doors on the outer hull of the starship. When torpedoes were fired, the outer doors were opened, allowing for the weapon's egress. Tubes may also have had inner doors, which protected the torpedo bay from the missiles' propulsion systems.
Mark VI torpedoes with terminium casings in 2285, and Mark VII photon torpedoes in 2293. At least the Mark VII torpedoes could not be programmed to fire themselves without a torpedo
Quantum Torpedoes:
Developed to improve upon and, eventually, replace the photon torpedo, the quantum torpedo uses an energetic release of a zero-point energy field to obtain basic yields of up to 52.3 isotons- twice as powerful as the most common photon torpedoes. More advanced versions similarly surpass the higher-grade of photon torpedoes, but to this point, are restricted to high-yield launchers only.
Introduced in the late 2360s, the quantum torpedo was part of the range of projects which formed Starfleet's response to the threats represented by the Borg and renewed activity by the Romulans. Although there is no theoretical upper limit on the size of a matter/antimatter torpedo warhead - the Cardassian 'Dreadnought' type heavy penetrator carries a two thousand kilogram m/am warhead for example - warheads beyond the 25 isoton range tend to be too large and heavy for use as truly effective anti-ship weapons. Starfleet wanted to develop a warhead which offered firepower in the 50+ isoton range without penalizing the agility of the weapon.
Starfleet R&D quickly decided to focus on a zero point energy system. Initial testing yielded a negative energy balance – it took more energy to initiate the zero point reaction than that reaction generated in turn. This problem was eventually surmounted and a 52.3 isoton quantum warhead was detonated at the Groombridge 273-2A facility.
The device works by generating an eleven dimensional space time membrane which is twisted into a string similar in structure to a super string. This process calls large numbers of subatomic particles into existence, liberating correspondingly large amounts of energy in the form of an explosion.
The production torpedo is of similar size to the standard photon torpedo and is made of a shell of densified Tritanium and Duranium foam coated in an ablative layer and an anti radiation polymer coating. Great attention has been paid to making the weapon stealthy in operation by minimizing the number of penetrations through the casing and by treating those which have been made.
The warhead itself comprises a zero-point field reaction chamber, which is formed from a teardrop shaped crystal of rodinium ditellenite jacketed with synthetic Neutronium and Dilithium. A zero-point initiator is attached to this; the initiator is made of an EM rectifier, a wave guide bundle, a subspace field amplifier, and a continuum distortion emitter. The emitter creates the actual pinch field from a conical spike 10-16 meters across at the tip.
The zero-point initiator is powered by the detonation of an uprated photon torpedo warhead with a yield of 21.8 isotons. The m/am reaction occurs at four times the rate of a standard warhead; the detonation energy is channeled through the initiator within 10-7 seconds and energizes the emitter, which imparts a tension force upon the vacuum domain. As the vacuum membrane expands over a period of 10-4 seconds, an energy potential equivalent to at least 50 isotons. is created. This energy is held by the chamber for 10-8 seconds and is then released by the controlled failure of the chamber wall.
The propulsion and guidance systems of the quantum torpedo also represent improvements over the standard photon. The computer system is based around Bioneural gel packs, allowing more efficient data processing and so improved guidance capability.
he quantum warhead relies on rapid energy extraction from zero-point vacuum. This is established from an 11-dimensional space-time membrane, twisted into a Genus-1 topology string, housed inside the ultraclean vacuum of a 1.38 meter-long teardrop shaped zero-point field reaction chamber. The detonation of a photon torpedo warhead, enriched with fluoronetic vapor, inside the torpedo powers a continuum distortion emitter. It expands the membrane and pinches it out of the background vacuum. The membrane forms into subatomic particles accompanied by a high-explosive energy release.
Propulsion system of the quantum torpedo is a warp sustainer engine and four microfusion thrusters. The engine coils of the warp sustainer grab and hold a hand-off warp field from the torpedo launcher tube's sequential field induction coils. A miniature matter/antimatter fuel cell adds power to the hand-off field. When launched in warp flight, torpedo will continue to travel at warp, when launched at sublight, torpedo will travel at a high sublight speed, but will not cross the warp threshold. The quantum torpedo uses a bio-neural gel processor for flight control, and a thoron web to block countermeasure radiation.
The warhead technology of the torpedoes was also revealed in the novel. It is based on generating a destructive subspace compression pulse. Upon detonation the torpedo delivers the pulse in an asymmetric superposition of multiple phase states. Shields can only block one subcomponent of the pulse. The other subcomponents deliver the majority of the pulse to the target. Every torpedo has a different transphasic configuration, generated randomly by a dissonant feedback effect to prevent the Borg from predicting the configuration of the phase states

Torpedo types
Quantum Flux Torpedo Mark XXIV
Quantum Transphasic torpedoes mark XL Seeking
Quantum Flux Torpedo XXI Seeking
quantum torpedo MARK 1
Photon Torpedo mark VI

Shield beam

Shield beam is a modification of the standard deflector andShield systems onboard any starship it just has been modified toAbsorb ray weapons energy and focus it can also fire a ship sizeBeam that can make any capitol ship think twice about attackingA ship that has it attacked an Atlantis class carrier
Firing options
Standard beam
Reflective beams
Absorbing shield
Plasma sphere
sphere
Point Defense System
Laser systems:
The advantage of a point defense system over any ECM system is that it can physically intercept missiles with either energy or missile weapons of its own. In the case of point defense lasers the system is beam-based.
The weakness is that each laser cluster, can only engage a single missile at a time. Recent tactical engagements have shown that volleys of 20 missiles at a time are not unheard of. So, the laser clusters are most effective when a number of ships are working together to shoot down a single broadside.
When the ships are deployed in a wall formation
[--] = 1 ship

[--] [--]
[--] [--]
[--] [--]
(and so on)
the overlapping fields of point defense fire make this system extremely effective. In one-on-one situations, the system is proportionally less effective. Any ship type can employ the system, but the problem is, of course, mass and power alocation. BB's have a lot more room, mass, and power capacity than DD's.
Other limitations include the fact that missiles maneuver and photon torpedoes are very fast. It takes a sustained (albeit not long) hit from a PD laser to destroy either. This is very hard to accomplish. A touch and go or glancing hit will not destroy the target.
The type I point defense laser was created in response to the Dalriadan War of 2410 and built into several series of ships first launched late in that year. The initial system was rushed into production. The lasers had an effective range of only 150,000 km, inside the 200,000 maximum detonation range of the Dalriadan missiles, but outside the normal detonation of 100,000 km.
Since 2410, there have been two revisions of the point defense laser system. The type II system was never put into production because it required significant retrofitting to enlarge capacitor banks to power the system due to poor power usage of the laser system employed. The current system, the type III has a refined laser core and can generate pulses capable of intercepting incoming fore to a range of 300,000 km.

Drone Systems:
The second type of point defense system is the drone. Drones attempt to draw enemy fire away from the starship which controls them and to themselves by using sophisticated ECM gear which makes the drone appear to be the starship itself to targetting sensors. A network of drones deployed around a starship which is itself using its ECM systesm, gives any incoming fire multiple targets which it must distinguish between in order to damage the actual ship.
Because some weapons, such as photon torpedoes, use proximity detonation and never actually strike the targetted ship, point defense drones also carry powerful jamming systems intended to interfere with guidance and targetting systems and to cause premature detonation
The Ablative Shield Generator is composed of 4 basic components:
1. Subspace divergence field generators.
2. Modified transporter pattern buffer.
3. Molecular pattern storage unit.
4. Emitter array.

The subspace divergence field has the ability to duplicate matter atom to atom of equal energy mass (E=mc^2). This field is generated in modified dual shield generators. The field is then shunt into the transporter pattern buffer where the subspace field is processed to give it an energy pattern of certain matter with the same properties such as colour, texture, and strength. The pattern is from the molecular pattern storage unit which contains the energy and molecular pattern of the metal known as adamantium. Adamantium is one of the strongest metals known to exist second only to neutronium. Why adamantium and not neutronium? Neutronium would burn out the pattern buffer instantly. Though adamantium can be replicated, the maximum possible output is only 2kg a day, so therefore, simulated adamantium is the next best solution. Also a starship does not have the energy storage to create a true shell around the ship. The newly formed adamantium pattern is sent to the emitter array where it forms a shell less than 1mm thick around the ship a few metres away, following the contours of the hull like the standard shield grid. This process differs from particle synthesis.
Since the shield generator requires a lot of power to maintain its "molecular structure," the ship has to sacrifice power from areas that also require a lot of power, such as warp drive or weapons. If for example weapons are needed, then warp engines are deactivated. If warp drive is needed, then weapons are powered down. It is a similar problem for warp capable stealth ships that uses cloaking devices such as the Klingons and the Romulans. Since the adamantium shell does not have a true molecular structure, then the shell can be opened and closed very easily in order to fire weapons for example. Opening in the shell for impulse and thrusters exhaust, warp grille and others are protected by independent force fields.
Since the shield was built in an alternate future, the temporal prime directive has halted the research and development of the ablative shield generator until the Sheliak War in the late 2380's


Bridge crew
⦁ Captain Mitch Bowen—Human
⦁ Dr. Seamus Wright—Shrive--Ship's Psychologist—A true Cockney born in East London; known to associate with people involved with London subcultures. After cadet training at the GFA Academy Wright got his doctorate in psychology at Oxford University in London.
⦁ David "Cowboy" Corben—Human—First Officer—An African American born and raised in a rural area outside of Dallas Texas. Called cowboy because of his distinctive Texas accent.
⦁ Frelsey Grame—Kumarrin male—science officer
⦁ Lt. Maurice Sanchez—human male—Helm Officer—Born in Puerto Rico on Earth.
⦁ Madhuksara—human female—Ops Officer—Born in India
⦁ Dr. Elton Schiguelle—Simma male—Chief of Medicine
⦁ Dr. Carm Sculapus—medical officer
⦁ Lt. Com. Lindsay Davis—human female—chief engineer
Fighter Pilots
Squadrons
The Wizards
⦁ Capt. Raymond "Merlin" West—Human-pilot
⦁ Lt. Argathreft "Orko" Wymdah—Simma-co-pilot
⦁ Lt. Pyra "Circe" N'gek—Kumarrin-pilot
⦁ Lt. Hanson "Sarumon" Bawk—Human
⦁ Lt. Shayna "Azkedelia" Bliss
⦁ Lt. Beth "Morgana" Sternberg—Human
⦁ Lt. Eric "Dumbledore" Roman
The Screaming Eagles
⦁ Capt. Chad "Raptor" Brent—Human
⦁ Lt. Hans "Hawk" Nold—Human
⦁ Lt. Ghullik "Griffon" Triege—Shrive
⦁ Lt. Dorma "Red Falcon" Morlara—Elnore
Lt. Baleena "Sparrow" Seena—Simma—female

Ships of the line
U.S.S. Atlantis CVX-4575
U.S.S. PACIFICA CVX-6090
U.S.S. El-Eldorado CVX-4579
U.S.S. Alexandria CVX-6070
U.S.S Shanghai-La CVX-6010
U.S.S. Camelot CVX-6020
U.S.S. Troy CVX-6030
U.S.S. Libraera CVX-4577
U.S.S. Andromeda CVX-4590

Visitors

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Wishlist

a man that mead a difference Glen A. Larson,

Journal Entry: Sat Nov 15, 2014, 4:22 PM


REX USA
 

The writer-producer also was behind 'Knight Rider,' 'Fall Guy' and 'Six Million Dollar Man'

Glen A. Larson, the wildly successful television writer-producer whose enviable track record includes Quincy M.E., Magnum, P.I., Battlestar Galactica, Knight Rider and The Fall Guy, has died. He was 77.

Larson also wrote and produced for such noteworthy series as ABC’s It Takes a Thief, starring his fellow Hollywood High School alum Robert Wagner as a burglar now stealing for the U.S. government, and NBC’s McCloud, with Dennis Weaver as a sheriff from Taos, N.M., who moves to Manhattan to help the big-city cops there.

 

After ABC spurned the original pilot for The Six MillionDollar Man (based on the 1972 novel Cyborg), Larson rewrote it, then penned a pair of 90-minute telefilms that convinced then-network executive Barry Diller to greenlight the action series, which starred Lee Majors as a former astronaut supercharged with bionic implants.

Other shows Larson created included Alias Smith & Jones, B.J. and The Bear, Switch (another series with Wagner), Manimal and The Misadventures of Sheriff Lobo. He spent his early career at Universal Studios, inventing new shows and reworking others, before moving to 20th Century Fox in 1980 with a multiseries, multimillion-dollar deal.

With Lou Shaw, Larson conceived Quincy M.E., which starred Jack Klugman — coming off his stint on The Odd Couple — as a murder-solving Los Angeles medical examiner. A forerunner to such “forensic” dramas as CSI, the series ran for 148 episodes over eight seasons on NBC from 1976-83.

CBS’ Magnum, P.I., toplined by Tom Selleck as a charismatic Ferrari-driving private instigator based in Oahu, Hawaii, also aired eight seasons, running from 1980-88 with 162 installments. Larson created the ratings hit with Donald Bellisario, with whom he had worked on Quincy and Battlestar.

NBC’s Knight Rider, starring David Hasselhoff as a crime fighter aided by a Pontiac Trans-Am with artificial intelligence (K.I.T.T., drolly voiced by William Daniels), lasted four seasons and 90 episodes from 1982-86. And ABC’s Fall Guy, with Majors as a stuntman who moonlights as a bounty hunter, prevailed for five seasons and 113 episodes spanning 1981-86.

If you’re counting, Quincy, Magnum, Knight Rider and Fall Guy accounted for 513 hours of television and 21 combined seasons from 1976-88.

During a 2009 interview with the Archive of American Television, Larson was asked how he could possibly keep up with such a workload.

“I tried to stay with things until I thought they were on their feet and they learned to walk and talk,” he said.

“If you believe if something, you must will it through, because everything gets in the way. Everyone tries to steer the ship off course.”

Battlestar Galactica lasted just one season on ABC from 1978-79, yet the show had an astronomical impact. Starring Lorne Greene and Richard Hatch as leaders of a homeless fleet wandering through space, featuring special effects supervised by Star WarsJohn Dykstra and influenced by Larson’s Mormon beliefs, Battlestar premiered as a top 10 show and finished the year in the top 25. But it was axed after 24 episodes because, Larson said, each episode cost “well over” $1 million.

“I was vested emotionally in Battlestar, I really loved the thematic things. I don’t feel it really got its shot, and I can’t blame anyone else, I was at the center of that,” said Larson, who years early had written a sci-fi script, Adam’s Ark, with a theme similar to Battlestar’s and had been mentored by Star Trek'Gene Coon. “But circumstances weren’t in our favor to be able to make it cheaper or to insist we make two of three two-hour movies [instead of a weekly one-hour series] to get our sea legs.”

Much like Star Trek before it, Battlestar became much more beloved after it was canceled. Universal packaged episodes into two-hour telefilms and added a “Battle of Galactica” attraction to its studio tour that proved hugely popular. A new version debuted in 2004 on the Sci-Fi Channel, followed by a spinoff, Caprica.

Yet for all his success, Larson had his share of critics.

Writer Harlan Ellison, in a 1996 book about his Star Trek teleplay for the famous episode “City on the Edge of Forever,” infamously called him “Glen Larceny,” accusing him of using movie concepts for his TV shows.

It often has been noted that Battlestar premiered soon after Star Wars, that Alias Smith & Jones arrived shortly after Butch Cassidy & the Sundance Kid and that the setups for McCloud and B.J. and The Bear bore similarities to the Clint Eastwood films Coogan’s Bluff and Every Which Way But Loose, respectively.

“Larson is undeniably a controversial figure in TV history because of his reputation for producing video facsimiles of popular films, but scholars, fans and critics should also consider that ‘similarity’ is the name of the game in the fast world of TV productions,” John Kenneth Muir wrote in his 2005 book, An Analytical Guide to Television’s Battlestar Galactica. “Shows are frequently purchased, produced and promoted by networks not for their differences from popular productions, but because of their similarities.”

Fox in 1978 sued Battlestar studio Universal for infringing on Star Wars copyrights but lost the suit years later, vindicating Larson, who described his TV show as “Wagon Train heading toward Earth.”

He also said that Alias Smith & Jones was “certainly in the genre of Butch Cassidy, a New Wave western” and compared B.J. and the Bear to something along the lines of the 1977 film Smokey & the Bandit.

He was not apologizing for any of this.

“Television networks are a lot like automobile manufacturers, or anyone else who’s in commerce. If something out there catches on with the public … I guess you can call it ‘market research,’ ” he said in the TV Archive interview. “You can go in and pitch one idea at a network and they’ll say, ‘You know, we’d really like it if you had something a little more like this.’ ”

And the trend goes on: new versions of Battlestar, Knight Rider, Manimal, Six Million Dollar Man and The Fall Guy have been floated about for the big screen in recent years.

Glen Albert Larson was born an only child on Jan. 3, 1937, in Long Beach, Calif. He and his parents moved to Los Angeles when he was young, and he became enthralled with the art of storytelling while listening to hour after hour of radio shows.

He met Wagner while hitchhiking to Hollywood High and landed a job as a page at NBC, then home to such live anthologies as Lux Video Theatre and Matinee Theatre.

Music took over when Capitol Records A&R exec Nik Venet signed The Four Preps to a long-term contract in 1956, and the wholesome youngsters recorded such hits as “Twenty Six Miles (Santa Catalina),” “Big Man," “Dreamy Eyes” and "Down by the Station."

“Ultimately, The Four Preps’ biggest influence can be heard via their impact on Brian Wilson, whose harmony-driven production for The Beach Boys was a direct antecedent of The Four Preps’ sound,” or so says a biography of the group on AllMusic.com.

The Preps appeared on The Adventures of Ozzie & Harriet, The Ed Sullivan Show and American Bandstand, played college campuses around the country and toured the world. But with a new wife and child, Larson wanted to get off the road, so he pursued a career in television and sold a story idea for a 1966 episode of The Fugitive.

Larson then wrote an episode of It Takes a Thief, and within the short span of a season he went from story editor to producing the series.

He created his first show, the ABC Western Alias Smith and Jones, which starred Peter Duel and Ben Murphy as outlaw cousins trying to go straight. He exited the series soon after Duel died of a self-inflicted gunshot on New Year’s Eve in 1971.

He did not get along with Klugman on Quincy and eventually left the show in the hands of Bellisario.

Selleck, who was under contract at Universal and had done a couple of pilots that had not made it to series, was obligated to do Magnum, whose pilot was written by Bellisario.

“We got the star, it was a perfect fit,” said Larson, who was a fan of the 1960s CBS series Hawaiian Eye, which centered on a detective agency. “I had a house over there [in Hawaii] and a guy [like Selleck’s character] who lived in a guest house and took care of it.”

Larson based the unseen novelist character Robin Masters, the owner of the home, on author Harold Robbins.

After years at Universal — where he also did The Hardy Boys/Nancy Drew Mysteries for ABC and Buck Rogers in the 25th Century for NBC — Larson left for Fox. But to get out of his Universal deal, he had to give the studio one more show, and that would be Knight Rider.

“Michael Knight [Hasselhoff’s character] in a way is a prototyped by the Lone Ranger,” Larson said. “If you think about him riding across the plains and going from one town to another to help law and order, then K.I.T.T. becomes Tonto.”

At Fox in the spring of 1983, he sold four new series: Manimal to ABC and Trauma Center, Automan and Masquerade to ABC, but all were quickly canceled.

Larson’s next show, CBS’ Cover Up — about a photographer (Jennifer O’Neill) who replaces her late husband as an undercover CIA agent — lasted one season. During production, actor Jon-Erik Hexum died as a result of an accidental self-inflicted blank-cartridge gunshot wound on the set.

In July 2011, Larson sued Universal, alleging a decades-long fraud perpetrated by a studio that he said never once sent him profit participation statements despite his shows earning hundreds of millions of dollars.

More recently, Larson reteamed up with The Four Preps, reuniting in 2004 for a PBS reunion show, Magic Moments, with best friends and fellow group members David Somerville and Bruce Belland.

Survivors include his wife Jeannie, brother Kenneth and nine children (including his son James) from former wives Carol Gourley and Janet Curtis: Kimberly, Christopher, Glen, Michelle, David, Caroline, Danielle and Nicole.

A memorial service will be held in the near future, his son said.

Despite his remarkable career churning out hits, Larson earned but three Emmy nominations, two for producing McCloud and one (for outstanding drama) for Quincy. He never won.

His shows, Larson said in the TV Archive interview, “were enjoyable, they had a pretty decent dose of humor. All struck a chord in the mainstream. What we weren’t going to do was win a shelf full of Emmys. We got plenty of nominations for things, but ours were not the kind of shows that were doing anything more than reaching a core audience. I would like to think we brought a lot of entertainment into the living room.”

Alex Ben Block contributed to this report.

Twitter: @mikebarnes4



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Bell X-2 Starbuster by bagera3005
Bell X-2 Starbuster
The Bell X-2 nicknamed "Starbuster" was a research aircraft built to investigate flight characteristics in the Mach 2–3 range. (The term "Starbuster" is seldom, if ever, found in contemporary accounts.)The X-2 was a rocket-powered, swept-wing research aircraft developed jointly in 1945 by Bell Aircraft Corporation, the U.S. Air Force and the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) to explore aerodynamic problems of supersonic flight and to expand the speed and altitude regimes obtained with the earlier X-1 series of research aircraft.

Design and development

The Bell X-2 was developed to provide a vehicle for researching flight characteristics in excess of the limits of the Bell X-1 and D-558 II, while investigating aerodynamic heating problems in what was then called the "thermal thicket".

The Bell X-2 had a prolonged development period due to the advances needed in aerodynamic design, control systems, high-temperature resistant materials to be used, and other technologies that had to be developed. Not only did the X-2 push the envelope of manned flight to speeds, altitudes and temperatures beyond any other aircraft at the time, it pioneered throttleable rocket motors in U.S. aircraft (previously demonstrated on the Me 163B during World War II) and digital flight simulation.[2] The XLR25 rocket engine, built by Curtiss-Wright, was based on the smoothly variable-thrust JATO engine built by Robert Goddard in 1942 for the Navy.

Providing adequate stability and control for aircraft flying at high supersonic speeds was only one of the major difficulties facing flight researchers as they approached Mach 3. For, at speeds in that region, they knew they would also begin to encounter a "thermal barrier", severe heating effects caused by aerodynamic friction. Constructed of stainless steel and a copper-nickel alloy, K-Monel, and powered by a liquid propellant (alcohol and oxygen) two-chamber XLR25 2,500 to 15,000 lbf (11 to 67 kN) sea level thrust, continuously throttleable rocket engine, the swept-wing Bell X-2 was designed to probe the supersonic region.[2]
Operational history

Following a drop launch from a modified B-50 bomber, Bell test pilot Jean "Skip" Ziegler completed the first unpowered glide flight of an X-2 at Edwards Air Force Base on 27 June 1952. Ziegler and aircraft #2 (46-675) were subsequently lost on 12 May 1953, in an inflight explosion during a captive flight intended to check the aircraft's liquid oxygen system.[4][5]
X-2, crew, and support equipment

Lt. Col. Frank K. "Pete" Everest completed the first powered flight in the #1 airplane (46-674) on 18 November 1955. By the time of his ninth and final flight in late July 1956 the project was years behind schedule, but he had established a new speed record of Mach 2.87 (1,900 mph, 3050 km/h). About this time, the YF-104A was demonstrating speeds of M = 2.2 or 2.3 in a fighter configuration. The X-2 was living up to its promise, but not without difficulties. At high speeds, Everest reported its flight controls were only marginally effective. High speed center of pressure shifts along with fin aeroelasticity were major factors. Moreover, simulation and wind tunnel studies, combined with data from his flights, suggested the airplane would encounter very severe stability problems as it approached Mach 3.

A pair of less experienced but excellent pilots, Captains Iven C. Kincheloe and Milburn G. "Mel" Apt, were assigned the job of further expanding the envelope and, on 7 September 1956, Kincheloe became the first pilot ever to climb above 100,000 ft (30,500 m) as he flew the X-2 to a peak altitude of 126,200 ft (38,466 m). Just 20 days later, on the morning of 27 September, Apt was launched from the B-50 for his first flight in a rocket airplane. He had been instructed to follow the "optimum maximum energy flight path" and to avoid any rapid control movements beyond Mach 2.7. With nozzle extenders and a longer than normal motor run, Apt flew an extraordinarily precise profile; he became the first man to exceed Mach 3, reaching Mach 3.2 (2,094 mph, 3,370 km/h) at 65,500 ft (19,960 m).

The flight had been flawless to this point, but, for some reason, shortly after attaining top speed, Apt attempted a banking turn while the aircraft was still above Mach 3 (lagging instrumentation may have indicated he was flying at a slower speed or perhaps he feared he was straying too far from the safety of his landing site on Rogers Dry Lake). The X-2 tumbled violently out of control and he found himself struggling with the same problem of "inertia coupling" which had overtaken Chuck Yeager in the X-1A nearly three years before. Yeager, although exposed to much higher vehicle inertial forces, as a result of extensive experience flying the X-1 was very familiar with its character, was able to recover. Apt attempted to recover from a spin, but could not, and fired the ejection capsule, which was itself only equipped with a relatively small drogue parachute. Apt was probably disabled by the severe release forces. As the capsule fell for several minutes to the desert floor, he did not emerge so that he could use his personal parachute.

While the X-2 had delivered valuable research data on high-speed aerodynamic heat build-up and extreme high-altitude flight conditions (although it is unclear how much as the X-7 and IM-99 were among the winged vehicles operating at comparable or higher velocities in this era), this tragic event terminated the program before the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics could commence detailed flight research with the aircraft. The search for answers to many of the riddles of high-Mach flight had to be postponed until the arrival three years later of the most advanced of all the experimental rocket aircraft, the North American X-15.
Flight test program

Two aircraft completed a total of 20 flights (27 June 1952 - 27 September 1956).

    46-674: seven glide flights, 10 powered flights, crashed 27 September 1956[5]
    46-675: three glide flights, destroyed 12 May 1953

Specifications
X2 3 view diagram.png

Data from Concept Aircraft: Prototypes, X-Planes and Experimental Aircraft[8]

General characteristics

    Crew: one, pilot
    Length: 37 ft 10 in (11.5 m)
    Wingspan: 32 ft 3 in (9.8 m)
    Height: 11 ft 10 in (3.6 m)
    Wing area: 260 ft² (24.2 m²)
    Airfoil: 2S-50 bicon
    Empty weight: 12,375 lb (5,600 kg)
    Loaded weight: 24,910 lb (11,300 kg)
    Max. takeoff weight: 24,910 lb (11,300 kg)
    Powerplant: 1 × Curtiss-Wright XLR25 rocket engine, 15,000 lbf (67 kN)at sea level

Performance

    Maximum speed: Mach 3.196 (2,094 mph, 3,370 km/h)
    Service ceiling: 126,200 ft (38,466 m)
Loading...

a man that mead a difference Glen A. Larson,

Journal Entry: Sat Nov 15, 2014, 4:22 PM


REX USA
 

The writer-producer also was behind 'Knight Rider,' 'Fall Guy' and 'Six Million Dollar Man'

Glen A. Larson, the wildly successful television writer-producer whose enviable track record includes Quincy M.E., Magnum, P.I., Battlestar Galactica, Knight Rider and The Fall Guy, has died. He was 77.

Larson also wrote and produced for such noteworthy series as ABC’s It Takes a Thief, starring his fellow Hollywood High School alum Robert Wagner as a burglar now stealing for the U.S. government, and NBC’s McCloud, with Dennis Weaver as a sheriff from Taos, N.M., who moves to Manhattan to help the big-city cops there.

 

After ABC spurned the original pilot for The Six MillionDollar Man (based on the 1972 novel Cyborg), Larson rewrote it, then penned a pair of 90-minute telefilms that convinced then-network executive Barry Diller to greenlight the action series, which starred Lee Majors as a former astronaut supercharged with bionic implants.

Other shows Larson created included Alias Smith & Jones, B.J. and The Bear, Switch (another series with Wagner), Manimal and The Misadventures of Sheriff Lobo. He spent his early career at Universal Studios, inventing new shows and reworking others, before moving to 20th Century Fox in 1980 with a multiseries, multimillion-dollar deal.

With Lou Shaw, Larson conceived Quincy M.E., which starred Jack Klugman — coming off his stint on The Odd Couple — as a murder-solving Los Angeles medical examiner. A forerunner to such “forensic” dramas as CSI, the series ran for 148 episodes over eight seasons on NBC from 1976-83.

CBS’ Magnum, P.I., toplined by Tom Selleck as a charismatic Ferrari-driving private instigator based in Oahu, Hawaii, also aired eight seasons, running from 1980-88 with 162 installments. Larson created the ratings hit with Donald Bellisario, with whom he had worked on Quincy and Battlestar.

NBC’s Knight Rider, starring David Hasselhoff as a crime fighter aided by a Pontiac Trans-Am with artificial intelligence (K.I.T.T., drolly voiced by William Daniels), lasted four seasons and 90 episodes from 1982-86. And ABC’s Fall Guy, with Majors as a stuntman who moonlights as a bounty hunter, prevailed for five seasons and 113 episodes spanning 1981-86.

If you’re counting, Quincy, Magnum, Knight Rider and Fall Guy accounted for 513 hours of television and 21 combined seasons from 1976-88.

During a 2009 interview with the Archive of American Television, Larson was asked how he could possibly keep up with such a workload.

“I tried to stay with things until I thought they were on their feet and they learned to walk and talk,” he said.

“If you believe if something, you must will it through, because everything gets in the way. Everyone tries to steer the ship off course.”

Battlestar Galactica lasted just one season on ABC from 1978-79, yet the show had an astronomical impact. Starring Lorne Greene and Richard Hatch as leaders of a homeless fleet wandering through space, featuring special effects supervised by Star WarsJohn Dykstra and influenced by Larson’s Mormon beliefs, Battlestar premiered as a top 10 show and finished the year in the top 25. But it was axed after 24 episodes because, Larson said, each episode cost “well over” $1 million.

“I was vested emotionally in Battlestar, I really loved the thematic things. I don’t feel it really got its shot, and I can’t blame anyone else, I was at the center of that,” said Larson, who years early had written a sci-fi script, Adam’s Ark, with a theme similar to Battlestar’s and had been mentored by Star Trek'Gene Coon. “But circumstances weren’t in our favor to be able to make it cheaper or to insist we make two of three two-hour movies [instead of a weekly one-hour series] to get our sea legs.”

Much like Star Trek before it, Battlestar became much more beloved after it was canceled. Universal packaged episodes into two-hour telefilms and added a “Battle of Galactica” attraction to its studio tour that proved hugely popular. A new version debuted in 2004 on the Sci-Fi Channel, followed by a spinoff, Caprica.

Yet for all his success, Larson had his share of critics.

Writer Harlan Ellison, in a 1996 book about his Star Trek teleplay for the famous episode “City on the Edge of Forever,” infamously called him “Glen Larceny,” accusing him of using movie concepts for his TV shows.

It often has been noted that Battlestar premiered soon after Star Wars, that Alias Smith & Jones arrived shortly after Butch Cassidy & the Sundance Kid and that the setups for McCloud and B.J. and The Bear bore similarities to the Clint Eastwood films Coogan’s Bluff and Every Which Way But Loose, respectively.

“Larson is undeniably a controversial figure in TV history because of his reputation for producing video facsimiles of popular films, but scholars, fans and critics should also consider that ‘similarity’ is the name of the game in the fast world of TV productions,” John Kenneth Muir wrote in his 2005 book, An Analytical Guide to Television’s Battlestar Galactica. “Shows are frequently purchased, produced and promoted by networks not for their differences from popular productions, but because of their similarities.”

Fox in 1978 sued Battlestar studio Universal for infringing on Star Wars copyrights but lost the suit years later, vindicating Larson, who described his TV show as “Wagon Train heading toward Earth.”

He also said that Alias Smith & Jones was “certainly in the genre of Butch Cassidy, a New Wave western” and compared B.J. and the Bear to something along the lines of the 1977 film Smokey & the Bandit.

He was not apologizing for any of this.

“Television networks are a lot like automobile manufacturers, or anyone else who’s in commerce. If something out there catches on with the public … I guess you can call it ‘market research,’ ” he said in the TV Archive interview. “You can go in and pitch one idea at a network and they’ll say, ‘You know, we’d really like it if you had something a little more like this.’ ”

And the trend goes on: new versions of Battlestar, Knight Rider, Manimal, Six Million Dollar Man and The Fall Guy have been floated about for the big screen in recent years.

Glen Albert Larson was born an only child on Jan. 3, 1937, in Long Beach, Calif. He and his parents moved to Los Angeles when he was young, and he became enthralled with the art of storytelling while listening to hour after hour of radio shows.

He met Wagner while hitchhiking to Hollywood High and landed a job as a page at NBC, then home to such live anthologies as Lux Video Theatre and Matinee Theatre.

Music took over when Capitol Records A&R exec Nik Venet signed The Four Preps to a long-term contract in 1956, and the wholesome youngsters recorded such hits as “Twenty Six Miles (Santa Catalina),” “Big Man," “Dreamy Eyes” and "Down by the Station."

“Ultimately, The Four Preps’ biggest influence can be heard via their impact on Brian Wilson, whose harmony-driven production for The Beach Boys was a direct antecedent of The Four Preps’ sound,” or so says a biography of the group on AllMusic.com.

The Preps appeared on The Adventures of Ozzie & Harriet, The Ed Sullivan Show and American Bandstand, played college campuses around the country and toured the world. But with a new wife and child, Larson wanted to get off the road, so he pursued a career in television and sold a story idea for a 1966 episode of The Fugitive.

Larson then wrote an episode of It Takes a Thief, and within the short span of a season he went from story editor to producing the series.

He created his first show, the ABC Western Alias Smith and Jones, which starred Peter Duel and Ben Murphy as outlaw cousins trying to go straight. He exited the series soon after Duel died of a self-inflicted gunshot on New Year’s Eve in 1971.

He did not get along with Klugman on Quincy and eventually left the show in the hands of Bellisario.

Selleck, who was under contract at Universal and had done a couple of pilots that had not made it to series, was obligated to do Magnum, whose pilot was written by Bellisario.

“We got the star, it was a perfect fit,” said Larson, who was a fan of the 1960s CBS series Hawaiian Eye, which centered on a detective agency. “I had a house over there [in Hawaii] and a guy [like Selleck’s character] who lived in a guest house and took care of it.”

Larson based the unseen novelist character Robin Masters, the owner of the home, on author Harold Robbins.

After years at Universal — where he also did The Hardy Boys/Nancy Drew Mysteries for ABC and Buck Rogers in the 25th Century for NBC — Larson left for Fox. But to get out of his Universal deal, he had to give the studio one more show, and that would be Knight Rider.

“Michael Knight [Hasselhoff’s character] in a way is a prototyped by the Lone Ranger,” Larson said. “If you think about him riding across the plains and going from one town to another to help law and order, then K.I.T.T. becomes Tonto.”

At Fox in the spring of 1983, he sold four new series: Manimal to ABC and Trauma Center, Automan and Masquerade to ABC, but all were quickly canceled.

Larson’s next show, CBS’ Cover Up — about a photographer (Jennifer O’Neill) who replaces her late husband as an undercover CIA agent — lasted one season. During production, actor Jon-Erik Hexum died as a result of an accidental self-inflicted blank-cartridge gunshot wound on the set.

In July 2011, Larson sued Universal, alleging a decades-long fraud perpetrated by a studio that he said never once sent him profit participation statements despite his shows earning hundreds of millions of dollars.

More recently, Larson reteamed up with The Four Preps, reuniting in 2004 for a PBS reunion show, Magic Moments, with best friends and fellow group members David Somerville and Bruce Belland.

Survivors include his wife Jeannie, brother Kenneth and nine children (including his son James) from former wives Carol Gourley and Janet Curtis: Kimberly, Christopher, Glen, Michelle, David, Caroline, Danielle and Nicole.

A memorial service will be held in the near future, his son said.

Despite his remarkable career churning out hits, Larson earned but three Emmy nominations, two for producing McCloud and one (for outstanding drama) for Quincy. He never won.

His shows, Larson said in the TV Archive interview, “were enjoyable, they had a pretty decent dose of humor. All struck a chord in the mainstream. What we weren’t going to do was win a shelf full of Emmys. We got plenty of nominations for things, but ours were not the kind of shows that were doing anything more than reaching a core audience. I would like to think we brought a lot of entertainment into the living room.”

Alex Ben Block contributed to this report.

Twitter: @mikebarnes4



Quantum comprastion  Zero-point Kinetic Energy Pen by bagera3005
Quantum comprastion Zero-point Kinetic Energy Pen
C.M.C
Is a weapon that fires a round of depleted uranium 235 to the speed of?Light C+ causing a fusion reaction in the uranium pack. A punch round is charged then fired out of amodified field coil. To sling the shell out of the barrel to C+ and then is adjusted to target by a magnetic ballshield, but will not stop C.M.C stiletto it will go through shields and throw all most any Mattel expedite for a Romulus Mattel use for their warp core. now systems can not be put on smaller ships, they take up two decks and are power hungry.

The warhead itself comprises a zero-point field reaction chamber, which is formed from a teardrop shaped crystal of rodinium ditellenite jacketed with synthetic Neutronium and Dilithium. A zero-point initiator is attached to this; the initiator is made of an EM rectifier, a wave guide bundle, a subspace field amplifier, and a continuum distortion emitter. The emitter creates the actual pinch field from a conical spike 10-16 meters across at the tip.

The zero-point initiator is powered by the detonation of an uprated photon torpedo warhead with a yield of 21.8 isotons. The m/am reaction occurs at four times the rate of a standard warhead; the detonation energy is channeled through the initiator within 10-7 seconds and energizes the emitter, which imparts a tension force upon the vacuum domain. As the vacuum membrane expands over a period of 10-4 seconds, an energy potential equivalent to at least 50 isotons. is created. This energy is held by the chamber for 10-8 seconds and is then released by the controlled failure of the chamber wall.

The propulsion and guidance systems of the quantum torpedo also represent improvements over the standard photon. The computer system is based around Bioneural gel packs, allowing more efficient data processing and so improved guidance capability.


Quantum composition  Zero-point CRITICAL MASS SHELL MARK  X
MASS Shells
Atlantis most powerful  
makes a wave in subspace on impact acting as shaped change most of its systems are classified  because it in theory it can imploded a star or make a nova crew likes to  call them nova bombs

  Critical Mass Cannons by bagera3005
Quantum Flux CRITICAL MASS SHELL mark  5 by bagera3005 Stiletto c-1 MARK 7 by bagera3005 Quantum Composition Zero-point  MASS SHELL by bagera3005 Quantum Composition Zero-point MASS SHELL MARK XI by bagera3005   
CRITICAL MASS CANNONS

C.M.C
Is a weapon that fires a round of depleted uranium 235 to the speed of?Light C+ causing a fusion reaction in the uranium pack. A punch round is charged then fired out of a modified field coil. To sling the shell out of the barrel to C+ and then is adjusted to target by a magnetic ball shield, but will not stop C.M.C stiletto it will go through shields and throw all most any Mattel expedite for a Elnor Mattel use for their warp core. now systems can not be put on smaller ships, they take up two decks and are power hungry.

24% mass shot rapid fire low power damaging round
50% mass half mass shot grazing damage on outer hauling star ships but vessel impacted is crippled or destroyed.
75 % mass is a large load and can go straight throw a Hell ken carrier
100% mass will destroy a 95 percent of a borg cube the Atlantis has to fire all c.m.c to do fall power shot it
most power is use to fire 100% power

Shell Types
Stiletto c-1
Haller c-2
Tri cobalt round c-3
Quantum round c-4
Shaker round c-5
Dart round c-6
Knights shot c-7
Archer tracking round c-9
Grape shot ball barring or C-10
Heavy barrel cd-1
Loading...

name for test-bed ment to replace Atlantis in story line its just an arc right now 

20%
12 deviants said give me one
18%
11 deviants said Challenger
15%
9 deviants said Discovery
13%
8 deviants said Endeavour
10%
6 deviants said Apollo
8%
5 deviants said Missouri
7%
4 deviants said Kennedy
3%
2 deviants said Intrepid
3%
2 deviants said Gemini
2%
1 deviant said Columbia

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o7 Salute!
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Hi. wanna join my group called Anti-illuminati-01? anti-illuminati-01.deviantart.…

P.S. The group is about politics in case you were wondering.

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thanks for the fresh batch of Faves.....
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Nice work man.
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thanks
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awesome stuff Mike my man. Keep it up and Happy Veteran's Day!
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